FEW Cold Cut Bourbon Whiskey

FEW Cold Cut Bourbon Whiskey with Cold Brew Coffee Tasting Notes

This is their standard bourbon brought down to a bottling strength of 46.5% from a cask strength of approximately 60% ABV, using cold brew coffee instead of water. Their bourbon has a mash bill of 70% corn, 20% rye and 10% malt, and is aged in Minnesota oak. Their coffee is sourced from local Passion House Coffee roasters on Goose Island.
 
FEW Cold Cut Bourbon Whiskey

 

Price: $42.99 (Binny’s). This bottle was purchased at FEW Distillery in Illinois.
 
Appearance: Copper/Amber. Almost red.
 

Tasting Notes

Nose: Cloves, baked apples with ground spices, dark brown sugar, almost like treacle, and the light sweetness of vanilla. Toasted banana bread.
 
Palate: Creamy in texture. All the notes on the nose follow through, baked green apples and vanilla but stronger ground spices, almost peppery. Milk chocolate, toffee and ripe red apples. Hints of fizzy cola sweets.
 
Finish: A hint of chilli and the bitterness of dark chocolate with salted caramel. Fizzy cola sweets and oaky spices. Here, you can taste the roasted coffee. It’s subtle but distinctive. A soft finish.
 
Overall: This is a bloody good dram that goes down easy and is incredibly more-ish. The coffee really compliments the flavour profile of the bourbon. You wouldn’t know that it was cut with cold brew except for in the softness of the mouthfeel. This is not a novelty, just a really successful experiment.

 


About FEW Spirits

Based on Evanston, Illinois, a suburb of Chicago, FEW pride themselves on being a grain-to-glass craft distillery with all ingredients sourced as locally as possible. Evanston was a dry city for almost a century, being home to the Temperance Movement led by Frances Elizabeth Willard. The distillery named themselves as an ironic nod to her when they opened in 2011 as the first legal distillery in Evanston since the prohibition. Though relatively young, FEW are already producing a range of award-winning gins and whiskies. The distillery uses two copper hybrid stills, one for whiskey and one for gin.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s